Movie Review: Children who Chase Lost Voices

Of all of Makoto Shinkai’s movies, Children who Chase Lost Voices stands out as the most unique. This is inherently ironic since it’s the most like a traditional anime, clearly inspired by Studio Ghibli movies. And while it deals with similar theme’s to Shinkai’s other works, this is an adventure story rather than a romance.

The story follows Asuna, a young girl who’s grown up too fast due to the loss of her father, who meets a mysterious boy one day. That boy soon dies, leading Asuna to a quest to the mythical underground kingdom of Agartha. Her companions for this adventure include the brother of her late friend, and an older man seeking the power of this place to resurrect his dead wife. Along the way, they meet various strange people and fantastic beasts.

From the plot description, Children who Chase Lost Voices sounds like many other fantasy coming of age adventure stories. What sets it apart is Shinkai’s attention to detail in every aspect. While the beings that inhabit Agartha range from the strange to the truly unsettling, everyone’s motivations and all of the events of the movie track in a very solid way. The fantasy is treated like a reality, making the narrative much more coherent than similar adventures. All three main characters are interesting in their own ways, and each feel complete if not entirely real. The obstacles they overcome and the decisions they make cause the movie’s two-hour runtime to progress more quickly than many of Shinkai’s shorter works.

The story of Children who Chase Lost Voices works because it rings true. The struggles the characters are going through are everyday struggles, exaggerated and warped into the context of an adventure movie, but they’re identifiable. This is particularly true of Asuna, who jumps into the adventure without much thought and has to discover on the way what she’s actually looking for. The emotional beats are very strong, and the movie doesn’t hesitate to put even its young characters in harrowing situations.

All of Shinkai’s other movies so far have a lot of thematic parallels to Your Name, but what Children who Chase Lost Voices shares with that masterpiece is that it is immaculately crafted. The visuals, the music, the characters, and the story all work in perfect sync. This is a movie that looks and sounds like a Studio Ghibli movie, but it’s not that. At its heart, it’s an exploration of loss and grief, yet not one that wallows in either. It is, in a word, excellent.

Review Score: A

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