Review: Game Dev Tycoon

Game Dev Tycoon is, predictably enough, a tycoon-style game where you play as a game developer. It lets you make games and grow your company from the post-video game crash early ’80s right through the generation to be released in 2020.

The gameplay of Game Dev Tycoon is simple and addictive. It’s the sort of games where hours can pass without you realizing it. You start off in your garage as a solo developer, and eventually work your way up to an office with a team of up to seven devs. But all of the mechanics and complications along the way are introduced at the perfect rate to keep things interesting but not overwhelming. You need to balance research and training with development, though making a good game is always paramount.

One of the reasons Game Dev Tycoon works so well is that a game’s success boils down to just two values, design and technology. How these are increased gets pretty complicated, but the core understanding of what they are and why you want them never changes. There are six genres of games to create, as well as mixed genres and MMO versions of them all, and each has its own optimal balance of the two. Games also increase in size as your team grows, necessitating specialists and a good mix of skills among your devs.

Part of the charm is that every actual significant console comes and goes during the game, complete with messages about how people thought they would perform and how they actually did. These can be especially amusing if you lived through these generations, watching the Dreamcast’s hype peak and immediately crash and the like. Knowing each console’s strengths is key to making best-selling games, though the game allows you to create games for the worst consoles around if you want.

The only real issue I have with Game Dev Tycoon is that it’s a lot simpler under the hood than it sometimes implies. You may be carefully considering which Level Design features to include, but the truth is, they’re all just numbers. No one is actually going to care that your RPG doesn’t allow save games. Still, even given this, the game has a lot of depth and just enough randomness to keep you looking for good opportunities.

If you like tycoon simulation games, Game Dev Tycoon is an easy recommendation. The topic is almost surely of interest to anyone playing these sorts of games, and the gameplay is quick, fun, and repeatable. They even let you carry over knowledge gleaned from one playthrough into the next. So have at it, see if you can host a convention to hype up a AAA MMO on a console you built.

Review Score: A−