Review: Borderlands: The Pre-Sequel

The oddly (but accurately) titled “Pre-Sequel” to Borderlands uses the Borderlands 2 engine, but introduces a number of new mechanics and classes to give a substantially different play experience. The story bridges the first two games, albeit from the perspective of Borderlands 2’s villain (who here is ostensibly the good guy, and in any case your character’s employer).

In story terms, the Pre-Sequel works fairly well. I didn’t detect any massive discontinuities in the storyline, though it suffers from the usual prequel problems. Specifically, some events occur that don’t contradict the story of Borderlands 2, but it sure seems odd they were never mentioned during that game. The general zaniness of the Borderlands universe lets them get away with some pretty amusing explanations for things, though. This is particularly true of Claptrap, who you can actually play as in this game.

The four classes are all new and bring a nice variety to the game. They aren’t analogs of the other games’ classes to nearly the extent they were in Borderlands 2, and the new action skills in particular are a lot of fun. Claptrap is enjoyably random, if you’re into that sort of thing. In addition to new classes, there is a new weapon type: lasers. These range from semi-automatic pew pew type lasers to constant lasers to railguns, and always have an elemental aspect. They start off a bit underpowered but in the long run are very useful and a lot of fun to use.

The game takes place on both the Hyperion space station you’ve seen so much, and Pandora’s moon. As such, you will be fighting in various levels of low gravity, which fundamentally changes both exploration and combat. O2 kits replace relics as an item type, offering various and often situational bonuses, and allowing you a double jump (more of a jump adjust) as well as a slam attack. This maneuverability leads to a lot of crazy but enjoyable platforming. Unfortunately, the enemies tend to have a lot more verticality than in other Borderlands games, often using jetpacks, and this makes them very difficult to track. They added above and below indicators for enemies here, but it’s often not enough.

The story of the Pre-Sequel is pretty straightforward, and a lot shorter than that of Borderlands 2. One big change in game flow is that you need to do most if not all of the sidequests to keep up with the recommended level here. Whether that’s a positive or a negative really depends on whether you’re an impatient completionist or the kind of person who thinks optional content should actually be optional.

All in all, the Pre-Sequel is a bit disappointing after Borderlands 2. The additions are fun, especially the low gravity maneuvers, but combat can be frustrating due to bland enemy design and the aforementioned issue with verticality. On the upside, the game doesn’t overstay its welcome, and the character classes are fun. The plot introduces seemingly important elements but nonetheless isn’t required to understand the story, so this is a Borderlands game for fans of the series more than anything else.

Review Score: B