Retro Review: Ultima II: Revenge of the Enchantress

Unlike its predecessors, Ultima II’s original version was released on PC, and thus doesn’t have a much-improved PC remake like Akalabeth and Ultima I. It is presented in glorious cyan, magenta, gray, and black, with no sound or frame limiter, and a number of crippling bugs. Fortunately all of this can be remedied with fan patches, bringing it up to snuff with the Apple II version of the game. However, this is still essentially the most technologically limited game in the Ultima series.

Unfortunately, the dated engine is not the problem here. The main problem with Ultima II is that progression relies on random inventory items, such as the Blue Tassle that lets you pilot stolen pirate ships. Any of these items may be dropped by thieves on the overworld, and thus spawning and killing overworld enemies in droves is the general method of play. Even worse, those same thieves can steal any item you’re holding, potentially putting you in a virtually unrecoverable position. The game features dungeons and towers, but they are entirely optional and generally too difficult to be worth exploring.

Ultima II is the only game in the series to take place on Earth, and not Sosaria/Britannia. You travel through different eras via time gates, predecessors to the moongates that appear in subsequent games. (The included map shows where the time gates go, but it is virtually indecipherable and not terribly useful even if you can read it.) How much you can accomplish depends on what thieves have dropped, and it’s quite possible to get stuck with nothing to do for a time.

Unfortunately there’s even less plot to this game than Ultima I. You take a space ship to the mysterious planet X (you can visit the rest of the solar system, but there’s no reason to do so) in order to find a magic ring, after which you can head to the final encounter. You can also undertake a sidequest the game barely hints at to find the ultimate weapon, a slight upgrade over the best one you can buy. The final boss is incredibly obnoxious, but no more so than the rest of the game.

In conclusion, there’s no really good reason to play Ultima II beyond a need to beat everything Ultima-related. It’s not good when the most interesting part of the game is that the Quicksword Enilno’s name is “online” spelled backwards. On the other hand, it does technically set up Ultima III’s plot, and Ultima III is a good game. But you’re better off reading the Ultima II synopsis in the Ultima III manual than actually playing this brutal game.

Review Score: F

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