Retro Review: Mega Man: Dr. Wily’s Revenge

Mega Man: Dr. Wily’s Revenge is a game with a good core concept, but very uneven execution. Rather than create all new bosses, the Gameboy Mega Man games re-use bosses from the NES series, but with a catch: there are four bosses each pulled from two games. Dr. Wily’s Revenge sets this model, but the way it does it is pretty odd.

By necessity, given the formula above, two of the six bosses from the original Mega Man are left out of this game. Guts ManĀ and Bomb Man were good choices to do away with. The four remaining bosses all have completely new, and very difficult, stages. While the bosses are re-used from the NES game, the stage design definitely is not. The much smaller Gameboy screen leads to cramped screens, and the game is designed with this in mind. They actually do an admirable job of making the size of the screen a non-factor.

The problem isn’t in porting Mega Man to the Gameboy, but rather it’s in trying to make a six-level game hard enough that people wouldn’t beat it in one sitting. And this game is very hard, especially at the start. All four opening stages basically require one or more weapons for easy traversal, so you’re going to have a tough time getting started no matter what you do. There are few death traps early on, but you have a smaller life meter than in the NES games and tend to take damage pretty frequently. The early game is a war of attrition, and in Mega Man 1 fashion, there are no Energy Tanks to help offset that fact.

It’s the latter half of the game where Dr. Wily’s Revenge falls apart, though. Instead of giving the four bosses from Mega Man 2 their own stages, you simply fight them all in a row, getting their weapons as you beat each. Even worse, there’s no indication which boss is which until you start fighting them, and you need to beat them all in a single set of lives. A new boss with a new weapon follows the four of them, leading to a very long fifth stage that can be extremely frustrating. The stage design also takes a turn for the worse at this point, with a number of traps that will just kill you if you happen to guess wrong when entering the next screen.

Also odd are the boss choices here. Fire Man and Heat Man both appear, though their weapons don’t work on the same foes, and Flash Man’s Time Stopper seems somewhat redundant with Ice Man’s Ice Slasher in terms of stopping enemies. The Mega Man 2 bosses don’t have the vulnerabilities to the Mega Man 1 weapons you’d expect, either, leading to a lot of trial and error on a limited number of lives.

There are some cool ideas in the Game Boy Mega Man games, but the negatives outweigh the positives in this first entry. The game’s difficulty is frustrating and requires more memorization than skill, and you barely get to use half of your weapons since you earn them at the end of the penultimate stage. The only real upside is that it is an original Mega Man game, which can whet your appetite if you’ve run out of NES entries to play. But this is a game that can be safely ignored.

Review Score: C